Virus leads to new business for local family SanTan Sun News

Virus leads to new business for local family

April 27th, 2020 STSN Staff
Virus leads to new business for local family
Business
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By PAUL MARYNIAK
Executive Editor

As with countless millions, the pandemic and the ensuing economic turmoil rocked the household of Kim and Dominic Palmieri.

But 30 days after their world was turned upside down, the family came up with a way to survive and help people stave off the coronavirus.

The CEO of a major food service business, Dominic and his family formed Sanitized Now, a mobile disinfection service that uses EPA-registered, hospital grade chemicals to disinfect just about any kind of space.

“We feel that we can help the Ahwatukee community by creating safer spaces for families, businesses, elderly residents etc.,” said Dominic’s daughter Carmela, a partner in the business that’s owned by her father.

“Sanitized Now has a solution for every home, office or business to help control spread of the coronavirus. We can sanitize almost any space to help keep employees and families safer,” she added.

Like it did for untold millions of others, the year began much differently for the Palmieris, who have lived in Ahwatukee for more than 30 years.

A freshman at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Carmela was studying business until she switched to biochemistry.

Her older brother Gino, a junior at the University of Southern California, was studying international business.

Their dad was CEO of Odyssey, LLC, a large concession company whose 600 employees provide food for the Arizona State Fair and many other fairs across the Southwest and a service supplier to a number of restaurants.

Then the pandemic began.

Carmela and Gino went home when their schools shut down.

As for dad, Carmela said, “We had a hugely successful food service company. Business had changed dramatically for us as we were experiencing shutdown on a mass scale.”

As the family huddled to figure out their next move, it dawned on them that even when the world returns to some kind of normalcy, the concern over infection will make businesses and customers think much differently about their environment.

“We had been looking at solutions to disinfect spaces of all sizes, primarily large spaces, but quickly realized that it was the family residences and small businesses that really needed our services more than ever with the pandemic in full swing.

“We were thinking of solutions to help get our current industry up and running,” she added, “and from there we decided to make it available to the public to help the community all around us.

“We thought with the recent world events, this was an opportunity to pivot from our previous business and begin something new.”

The Palmieris repurposed equipment they already had and put 24 employees in new roles.

Boasting a kill rate of nearly 100 percent, Santized Now envisions an almost limitless customer base – from churches to private homes, community and game centers to offices and small businesses and even stadiums.

The misting spray used to apply the chemical ”can get into places that are just too hard to clean yet are perfect places for the spread and growth of virus and bacteria.”

“A perfect example of spaces that are very difficult to treat yet potentially breed infection are backs of knobs, door handles, kitchen cabinet doors, the back inside of dishwasher pull handles, in and around counter tops,” she said.

She also noted most people don’t realize that most cleaning rags “just push and spread infection from surface to surface.”

The Palmieris see Sanitized Now as a much-needed company in what Carmela calls “a post-COVID world” because “sanitizing is an ongoing process.”

“Infection levels of virus and bacteria depend on the daily or weekly cleaning and sanitizing that businesses or residents do in their spaces,” she said. “Depending on the level of contaminants that keep coming in to the space and how many people are in and out vary and make every space have a different rate of contamination.”

Thus, its service isn’t a one-time-fixes-all.

Sanitized Now takes “before
and after” cultures so customers “know we are making every effort to really disinfect as much as possible.”

“We have digital testing that measures the actual life energy of single cell organisms and we can check our effectiveness,” she explained. “It is important that our customers know we are here to help them start protocols of proper cleaning and disinfecting procedures.”

In accordance with its motto – “Keeping Spaces Safer For Everyone” – the company gives their customers a sticker and sign that declares “that they have created a SSS – Sanitized Safe Space” – similar to security alarm companies that give their clients warning signs.

“We date it for customers to see and track when they received service,” she said, adding that “helps to evaluate how often they may need more in-house processes or having us come on a regular schedule every few weeks or monthly, depending on activity in the space.”

At a time when businesses are itching to reopen, Carmela said, “They have to make new efforts to keep spaces safer for both their employees and their customers and they are trying to figure best practices.

“Using our services will help get infection in the home or business down to very low levels,” Carmela added. “Along with daily and weekly maintenance by the individuals – including a lot of hand washing, taking off shoes at the front door – we help to keep infection down to extremely low and safe levels.”

While closed on Sundays, Sanitized Now arranges visits to suit the customer’s schedule. Rates range from 8 cents to 20 cents per square foot.

Information: 602-763-7194, sanitzednow.com and facebook.com/sanitizednow

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